Professional education

March of Dimes offers a range of educational opportunities for health professionals. Some of these opportunities include continuing education credits. We offer website resources, nursing modules, genetics education resources and more.

Implicit Bias Training (CNE and CME Available)

“Breaking Through Bias in Maternity Care,” is an implicit bias training course that provides health care professionals with important insights to recognize and remedy implicit bias in maternity care settings. This unique learning experience delivered in-person or through a self-paced, e-learning platform provides authentic and compelling content for health care providers caring for women before, during and after pregnancy. The training includes 4 key components:

  1. Overview of implicit bias and personal assessment.
  2. Historical overview of structural racism in the U.S.
  3. Strategies to mitigate racial bias in maternity care.
  4. Building a culture of equity within an organization.

While the training alone will not lead to immediate improvements in racial and ethnic disparities, it can help professionals recognize and change behaviors that will improve patient-provider communication, quality of care and begin a culture shift towards the broader goal of achieving equity for moms and babies.

Click here to inquire about opportunities to provide Implicit Bias Training to health care providers at your organization.

March of Dimes is looking for clinical sites in California (Los Angeles, Fresno, Santa Clara), Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, Nevada and Washington, D.C. to participate in our Health Equity Partnership Program featuring Breaking Through Bias in Maternity Care Implicit Bias Training.  Deadline for applications is November 17, 2020.  Download the application.

 

The American Hospital Association recognizes the value of this important training program and the potential benefits of its use by health care providers across the country to better identify and remedy implicit bias.

Nursing education (CNE Available)

For more than 30 years, March of Dimes has offered continuing education to perinatal nurses. Developed by top experts in the field, our print and online materials can be used for individual or group study. Examples of available courses are listed below. Check with your hospital about courses available on HealthStream.

  • Preconception health promotion: The foundation for a healthier tomorrow
  • Skin to Skin: The journey towards best practice
  • Easing Parent Trauma in the NICU: Trauma-Informed Care for NICU Nurses
  • The Child and Medical Complexities: Designing a Better Pathway from Hospital to Home
  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Addressing Models of Care which Support the Baby and Family

Genetics education

Our Preconception and Prenatal Genetic Screening Pocket Facts describes widely used screening methods and data for certain birth defects. Our Newborn Screening pocket facts focuses on the 28 metabolic conditions plus hearing that are currently screened for as part of the standard panel. Since the guide was first printed, the panel now includes screenings for congenital heart defects and severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome.

Early Entry into Prenatal Care Resource Guide

March of Dimes is committed to addressing early entry into prenatal care to reduce negative health outcomes for mothers and babies. This toolkit is designed to give those on the front lines of maternal and child healthcare the resources needed to increase access to early prenatal care in communities across the U.S.

 

 

Safer Cultures Roadmap

The Safer Culture Roadmap is a free, online toolkit that helps health care leaders build a culture within their organization that promotes patient safety, particularly within their perinatal programs. It you takes you step-by-step through the process of evaluating, building and sustaining an organizational culture that promotes safety, which translates into positive health benefits for moms and babies. March of Dimes funding supported the development of the toolkit by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Click here to learn more.