Research & data

For more than 75 years, the March of Dimes has been committed to bringing science into service for people by not only advocating for research, but also conducting it.  Each year, the March of Dimes funds studies examining key maternal and child health policy issues and generating the evidence necessary for policymakers to pursue informed decisions.

Every two years, the March of Dimes Office of Governments Affairs produces its Data Book for Policymakers, a compendium of facts, statistics, and charts on maternal and child health issues such as access to care, prematurity and low birthweight births, newborn screening, infant mortality, maternal mortality and health promotion.  The Data Book is available in print or online.

The March of Dimes also produces Issue Briefs on major health topics important to women, children and families, such as health insurance, newborn screening, obesity, and preventive health.  Our Issue Briefs are available online and can be found below.

The March of Dimes Office of Government Affairs periodically collaborates with academic institutions and other experts to conduct studies in key maternal and child health policy issues. In recent years, these have resulted in the following publications:

  • Changes in Insurance Coverage, Access to Care, and Health Care Affordability for Women of Childbearing Age. Adele Shartzer, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini, and Sharon K. Long. Urban Institute Health Policy Center, October 2015. View report
  • Trends in Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays & Costs, 2002–2009: Implications for the Future. Tara Trudnak Fowler, Gerry Fairbrother, Pamela Owens, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini, Lisa Simpson.  Medicare & Medicaid Research Review, 2014, Vol. 4 Issue 4, pp. E1–E17. cms.gov/mmrr/Articles/A2014/MMRR2014_004_04_a03.html
  • Medicaid Covered Births, 2008 Through 2010, in the Context of the Implementation of Health Reform. Anne Rossier Markus, Ellie Andres, Kristina D. West, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini.  Women’s Health Issues, Sept-Oct 2013, Vol. 23, Issue 5, pp. e273-280. 
    whijournal.com/article/S1049-3867(13)00055-8/abstract
    Erratum: whijournal.com/article/S1049-3867(13)00082-0/fulltext

Beginning in 2014, the March of Dimes partnered with AcademyHealth to support an annual New Investigator Small Grant in maternal and child health.  This grant is currently funding research to examine the impact of Massachusetts’ health insurance reform on birth outcomes.  More information is available about the New Investigators program here. academyhealth.org/Training/content.cfm?ItemNumber=13643

Finally, March of Dimes Office of Government Affairs staff periodically author blogs, articles or other publications.  Recent examples include: 

  • HHS Must Remove Barriers To Coverage For Pregnant Women.  Nicole Garro, Brittany Hernandez and Cynthia Pellegrini. Health Affairs blog, February 19, 2016. View online.
  • Medicaid Expansion: Benefits For Women of Childbearing Age And Their Children.  Cynthia Pellegrini and Nicole Garro. Health Affairs blog, February 22, 2013. View online.


More information:

For more than 75 years, the March of Dimes has been committed to bringing science into service for people by not only advocating for research, but also conducting it.  Each year, the March of Dimes funds studies examining key maternal and child health policy issues and generating the evidence necessary for policymakers to pursue informed decisions.

Every two years, the March of Dimes Office of Governments Affairs produces its Data Book for Policymakers, a compendium of facts, statistics, and charts on maternal and child health issues such as access to care, prematurity and low birthweight births, newborn screening, infant mortality, maternal mortality and health promotion.  The Data Book is available in print or online.

The March of Dimes also produces Issue Briefs on major health topics important to women, children and families, such as health insurance, newborn screening, obesity, and preventive health.  Our Issue Briefs are available online and can be found below.

The March of Dimes Office of Government Affairs periodically collaborates with academic institutions and other experts to conduct studies in key maternal and child health policy issues. In recent years, these have resulted in the following publications:

  • Changes in Insurance Coverage, Access to Care, and Health Care Affordability for Women of Childbearing Age. Adele Shartzer, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini, and Sharon K. Long. Urban Institute Health Policy Center, October 2015. View report
  • Trends in Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays & Costs, 2002–2009: Implications for the Future. Tara Trudnak Fowler, Gerry Fairbrother, Pamela Owens, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini, Lisa Simpson.  Medicare & Medicaid Research Review, 2014, Vol. 4 Issue 4, pp. E1–E17. cms.gov/mmrr/Articles/A2014/MMRR2014_004_04_a03.html
  • Medicaid Covered Births, 2008 Through 2010, in the Context of the Implementation of Health Reform. Anne Rossier Markus, Ellie Andres, Kristina D. West, Nicole Garro, Cynthia Pellegrini.  Women’s Health Issues, Sept-Oct 2013, Vol. 23, Issue 5, pp. e273-280. 
    whijournal.com/article/S1049-3867(13)00055-8/abstract
    Erratum: whijournal.com/article/S1049-3867(13)00082-0/fulltext

Beginning in 2014, the March of Dimes partnered with AcademyHealth to support an annual New Investigator Small Grant in maternal and child health.  This grant is currently funding research to examine the impact of Massachusetts’ health insurance reform on birth outcomes.  More information is available about the New Investigators program here. academyhealth.org/Training/content.cfm?ItemNumber=13643

Finally, March of Dimes Office of Government Affairs staff periodically author blogs, articles or other publications.  Recent examples include: 

  • HHS Must Remove Barriers To Coverage For Pregnant Women.  Nicole Garro, Brittany Hernandez and Cynthia Pellegrini. Health Affairs blog, February 19, 2016. View online.
  • Medicaid Expansion: Benefits For Women of Childbearing Age And Their Children.  Cynthia Pellegrini and Nicole Garro. Health Affairs blog, February 22, 2013. View online.


More information: